0 All Booked All Booked All Booked 5285 Mrs. Beazley’s Hair: In Between Races, a Special Caste—Melungeons, Family Stories, Medical System Risks, and Other Not-Quite-White Conundrums https://wsuu.org/?event=mrs-beazleys-hair-in-between-races-a-special-caste-melungeons-family-stories-medical-system-risks-and-other-not-quite-white-conundrums-2&event_date=2019-05-09&reg=1 https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr 2019-05-09

Mrs. Beazley’s Hair: In Between Races, a Special Caste—Melungeons, Family Stories, Medical System Risks, and Other Not-Quite-White Conundrums


2019-05-09 19:00 2019-05-09 20:30 America/Los_Angeles Mrs. Beazley’s Hair: In Between Races, a Special Caste—Melungeons, Family Stories, Medical System Risks, and Other Not-Quite-White Conundrums

In southern and central Appalachia, there have existed scattered communities and clans of darker-skinned people generally known as Melungeons, whose origins have puzzled scholars for at least 160 years. Prior to the Civil War, they were usually considered free people of color and were subject to the Colored Laws in the South. In Tennessee during the first half of the 20th century, some Melungeon children and youth were taken from their families and placed in special residential schools, where they were taught a trade. In many lighter-skinned families, for protection the heritage was kept a secret from younger generations, until the knowledge of it disappeared. In our times, many Melungeon-descended families have long since left the mountains and hollows where their ancestors kept their distance from white society. I am one of those descendants, and I’ve been studying the unfolding research around Melungeons since the early 1990s, when my sister first discovered our heritage. In this class, we’ll briefly cover the known history of various Melungeon groups, and the results of the limited genetic studies done to date. We’ll look at photographs and consider oral history, and we’ll look at Melungeons in popular culture. We’ll also consider the risks these ancestors may have run in being who they were, how some improved their chances of being considered white, and risks that have applied in my life and the lives of some of my family members due to our appearance. Finally, we’ll look at modern-day Melungeon gatherings and activism. Leader/Facilitator:Marion Kee, marion@pobox.com

Social Hall, Westside UU Congregation 7141 California Ave SW, Seattle, WA 98136, USA

In southern and central Appalachia, there have existed scattered communities and clans of darker-skinned people generally known as Melungeons, whose origins have puzzled scholars for at least 160 years. Prior to the Civil War, they were usually considered free people of color and were subject to the Colored Laws in the South. In Tennessee during the first half of the 20th century, some Melungeon children and youth were taken from their families and placed in special residential schools, where they were taught a trade. In many lighter-skinned families, for protection the heritage was kept a secret from younger generations, until the knowledge of it disappeared.

In our times, many Melungeon-descended families have long since left the mountains and hollows where their ancestors kept their distance from white society. I am one of those descendants, and I’ve been studying the unfolding research around Melungeons since the early 1990s, when my sister first discovered our heritage.

In this class, we’ll briefly cover the known history of various Melungeon groups, and the results of the limited genetic studies done to date. We’ll look at photographs and consider oral history, and we’ll look at Melungeons in popular culture. We’ll also consider the risks these ancestors may have run in being who they were, how some improved their chances of being considered white, and risks that have applied in my life and the lives of some of my family members due to our appearance. Finally, we’ll look at modern-day Melungeon gatherings and activism. Leader/Facilitator:Marion Kee, marion@pobox.com